Doh! What's eating my tomatoes?

HomeForumsTomato Insect & Pest ControlDoh! What's eating my tomatoes?

This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by greenqueen greenqueen 4 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #585
    IrieGardener
    IrieGardener
    Participant

    Some of my tomatoes have been rotting and I spotted some small holes and what look like little poops.  Could they be from some kind of worm?

    #590
    happychicken
    happychicken
    Participant

    Whatever the cause, I hope you have picked the infected fruit and safely discarded it to avoid spreading the disease. the holes could be from cutworms if you see some damage at the stemline of the plant. If so, get a flashlight and pick them off your plants. (they work at night.  The dots could also be from flea beetles or some other pesky insect. Insect damage leaves tomatoes vulnerable to viruses or fungal disease. Are the tomatoes rotting for the blossom end? If so it is probably blossom end rot which is usually caused by a combination of calcium deficiency and lack of water.  As part of my planting regimen  I add several crushed eggshells to the soil around the transplant and I never have blossom end rot problems.

    #607
    happychicken
    happychicken
    Participant

    When do you pick your tomatoes? I harvest as soon as the end begins to turn red. I once thought they had more flavor if you left them on the vine longer but this is not true. The longer you leave them growing, the more chance for insects and disease to attack. Don’t put them is a sunny window to ripen either. Tomatoes need warmth, not light to ripen. Last year after 2 back to back tropical storms brought hoards of insects to feast on my tomatoes, I harvested all of them, many were green. I ripened them on my dining room table and they were delicious!

    #715
    LilyRose
    LilyRose
    Participant

    To find the tomato eating culprit, go out early in the morning with a piece of white paper and a magnifying glass to scout. Look carefully at the ground, the stem and the leaves of the plant. If they are worms, you will see them. (Use the magnifying glass.) A good home remedy for worms is to fill a tuna fish can with beer and bury it near the plant. Nasty tomato chomping worms love beer and they will climb in the can and drown! Good luck!

    #796
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    Two easy tricks to keep the critter’s at bay. First, I make paper collars for my tomato plants out of newspaper. Second, I never let leaves touch the ground. This not only helps with insect control, but with disease too because many diseases come from the soil. As the tomatoes produce, I strip the bottom leaves making sure the producing tomatoes are covered. This helps with air circulation and just makes for a healthier plant.

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