What Should I Grow?

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by greenqueen greenqueen 4 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #555

    gardenhoney79
    Participant

    As a newbie, I am looking online and see there are over 600 types of tomato plants…yikes!  How do I know what type to pick and grow?  Is one type easier to grow and more tolerant than others? I love tomatoes of all kinds, big, small, you name it…I love tomatoes!  I just want to be sure there aren’t some types that require the skills of a long-time expert (which, clearly, I am not!).

    #584
    LilyRose
    LilyRose
    Participant

    I look for tomato varieties that taste good, are disease resistant and grow well in my area which is North Florida. I have grown many varieties but my all time favorites that I keep coming back to are:
    1. Celebrity – An all American Selections Winner. Highly productive, adaptable and resistant to wilt, root know nematode Mosaic Virus and Alternaria stem canker. The Celebrity seems to perform well in our often humid and hot climate.
    2. Sweet Gold  – Vining gold cherry tomatoes that are bright, beautiful and sooo sweet and yummy Very vigorous and happy rambling on a fence. Once you taste these, you will be hooked!
    3. Cherakee Purple – An heirloom variety that I first tasted in North Carolina and it was love at first bite! I grows some every year because they are beautiful dusty rose to purple tomatoes with fantastic flavor.

    #608
    happychicken
    happychicken
    Participant

    This totally depends of where you live. Check out good garden centers for transplants. You are looking for healthy plants with no yellow leaves or evidence of disease or insect damage. Don’t pick the tall spindly plant either. You want lush green leaves and sturdy stems. When you get the plants home, harden them off by exposing them to the sun a little more each day.  If you are not ready to put them in the ground be sure to step them up to a larger pot before they get root bound. Tomato plants grow at a very rapid rate. When you step them up, strip off all but the top few leaves and bury the stem. Use a good vegetable potting mix and dampen the mix before you plant. DON’T over water! The dirt should be moist, not soggy. I always add a pinch of fertilizer (10-10-10 or a good organic brand.) in a corner, if your transplant pot is small or around the drip line of the plant, if the transplant is larger (1 quart pot or more.) Good luck! Once you’ve tasted your own home grown tomato, you will be hooked.

    #754
    LilyRose
    LilyRose
    Participant

    Wait to put your transplant in the ground until the soild warms in the spring and the transplants are about 1 foot tall. Then still strip the lower leaves and bury the stem. Tomatoes will grow more roots on the buried stema nd this makes for a stronger and healthier plant.

    #793
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    As a “newbie” tomato grower, you may find it easier to grow in pots. When your transplant gets to be about 1 foot tall, transplant into a large (5 gallon) pot or bucket. Use a good all purpose potting soil and put several cups of black cow or black hen in the bottom of the pot. Add the recommended dose of fertilizer, then insert your transplant, burying the stem to the upper most leaves. Place the pot where it gets 6-8 hours of continuous sun and water when needed. Don’t over-water. Pinch off the suckers and have support available as the plant grows. Good  luck.

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