greenqueen

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  • in reply to: Worm Castings #807
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
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    I started this year using a pinch of worm casting  in my seed pots. I know worm castings are an incredible fertilizer and many of my friends use them with great success. check online for good sources.

    in reply to: Growing heirloom tomatoes #798
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    Heirloom tomatoes are delicious however they are not for you if you like the uniformly round red tomatoes you find in the grocery store. Heirlooms can be purple, yellow, pinkish and many other colors. You can find may seed companies online that sell heirloom seeds. Try to find one especially for your area. Use good cultural practices; grow in raised beds or large pots, provide plenty of spacing between plants, bury the stems of your seedlings for maximum root structure, water from the ground and don’t over water, and mulch to prevent soil born disease from splashing onto the plants. Generally do everything you would do with a hybrid tomato to produce a great harvest!

    in reply to: Bagged soil and nutrients #797
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    I steer away from bagged soil because it is so expensive. Instead I have my favorite nursery deliver a load of compost. If I don’t need that much, my husband picks it up from the nursery in huge plastic pots. It is much cheaper. Years ago, I used to be able to get free compost from the city. You had to take a truck to the site and load it but it was surely worth it.

    in reply to: Doh! What's eating my tomatoes? #796
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    Two easy tricks to keep the critter’s at bay. First, I make paper collars for my tomato plants out of newspaper. Second, I never let leaves touch the ground. This not only helps with insect control, but with disease too because many diseases come from the soil. As the tomatoes produce, I strip the bottom leaves making sure the producing tomatoes are covered. This helps with air circulation and just makes for a healthier plant.

    in reply to: What Should I Grow? #793
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    As a “newbie” tomato grower, you may find it easier to grow in pots. When your transplant gets to be about 1 foot tall, transplant into a large (5 gallon) pot or bucket. Use a good all purpose potting soil and put several cups of black cow or black hen in the bottom of the pot. Add the recommended dose of fertilizer, then insert your transplant, burying the stem to the upper most leaves. Place the pot where it gets 6-8 hours of continuous sun and water when needed. Don’t over-water. Pinch off the suckers and have support available as the plant grows. Good  luck.

    in reply to: Tomato experiment #792
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    I spoke too soon. Two nights of temperatures in the low 30’s and my beautiful tomato vine withered and is now compost. Oh well. I have new transplants that are about 4 inches tall and will be ready to go in the ground next month!

    in reply to: how and when to plant tomato seeds #744
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    I live in North Florida and I started these tomatoes from seed, inside and under lights 3 weeks ago. (mid January) This week I moved them outdoors into a cold frame (a plastic tub with an cold window on top which I remove during the day.)  Of course we have basically had no winter and if it gets frosty, I will have to cover them. I like to get tomatoes in the ground as early as possible because by July  bugs and disease are rampant and I pull my tomatoes by then. FYI these plants are Cherokee Purple and Sweet gold.

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    in reply to: Big green worms ate my tomatoes! #741
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    You’r on the right track lily Rose. You have been introduced to the most destructive tomato hornworm and picking them off is the right thing to do. Of course they are the same color as tomato plants so they are hard to see. The larva are destructive too and if you have a bad infestation, try BT (baccillus thuringiensis) which is a biological pesticide.  They will also cause damage to other members of the nightshade family including eggplant and peppers so check those plants out too if you are growing them.

    in reply to: Rain barrels – So easy! #718
    greenqueen
    greenqueen
    Participant

    This is a great idea! It’s hard to believe that the rain off a shed fills so many rain barrels. it must be a huge shed! Don’t you have a problem with mosquitoes because of all the standing water?

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)